Association News

NEMA Says DOE Border Enforcement falls short in multiple areas.

Press Release Summary:

Jul 01, 2016 - In written comments filed with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NEMA emphasized support for federal energy conservation standards and efforts by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to prevent noncompliant products from entering USA. NEMA also expressed concern about DOE's strategy regarding noncompliant products and recommended government agencies better utilize available data to protect consumers from illegal imports – "noncompliant products that have never been declared."

National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) - Rosslyn, VA

Original Press Release

NEMA Says DOE Efforts on Border Enforcement Fall Short

Press release date: Jun 29, 2016

Electrical manufacturers urge federal agencies to enforce energy conservation standards for imported products

ROSSLYN, Va.—In written comments filed with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) emphasized its support for federal energy conservation standards and efforts by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to prevent noncompliant products from entering the country. However, NEMA expressed concern about the DOE’s strategy regarding noncompliant products and recommends that government agencies better utilize available data to protect consumers from illegal imports.

“NEMA welcomes the DOE’s attention to the issue, but the proposal falls well short of accomplishing the goal because the agency is not addressing noncompliant products that have never been declared,” said NEMA President and CEO Kevin J. Cosgriff. “Moreover, why should the DOE impose duplicative paperwork burdens on compliant manufacturers when the agency already has the information on file?”

This isthe second set of comments that NEMA has submitted on this rulemaking, as the DOE reopened the comment period on May 16 for its December 2015 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. NEMA’s initial set of detailed comments on the proposal were filed in March.

“The DOE appears to be ignoring the issue of interdicting imports of products for which documentation does not yet exist,” explained Cosgriff. “In addition, the DOE has not responded in writing with its views on the viability of a trusted trader approach that NEMA recommends, especially for high-volume importers. Such a program would address regulatory burden concerns for law-abiding manufacturers and importers.”

In its comments, NEMA reiterated its recommendations that the DOE conduct additional meetings with stakeholders and work with industry to set up pilot programs for covered product categories of the highest priority.

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) represents nearly 400 electrical, medical imaging, and radiation therapy manufacturers on the forefront of electrical safety, reliability, resilience, efficiency, and energy security. Our combined industries account for more than 400,000 American jobs and more than 7,000 facilities across the United States. Domestic production exceeds $117 billion per year.

Press contact:
Tracy Cullen
703.841.3282
press@nema.org

National Electrical Manufacturers Association
www.nema.org