Association News

NEMA and UL announce revisions to UL 943 GFCI Standard.

Press Release Summary:

Feb 02, 2015 - NEMA and Underwriters Laboratories announce changes to UL 943 Standard for Safety for Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupters that will take effect on June 29, 2015. Revisions to tri-national standard were developed by NEMA-led group in response to Consumer Product Safety Commission requesting auto monitoring requirements on GFCIs. To maintain certification, all manufacturers must meet these revisions with GFCIs produced after June 28, 2015. 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) - Rosslyn, VA

Original Press Release

NEMA and UL Announce Revisions to UL 943 GFCI Standard

Press release date: Jan 29, 2015

ROSSLYN, Va., —The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) with UL (Underwriters Laboratories) announce changes to the UL Standard 943 Standard for Safety for Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) (Tri-national harmonized UL 943/CSA C22.2 No. 144.1/ANCE NMX-J-520) that will take effect on June 29, 2015. To maintain certification, all manufacturers must meet these revisions with GFCIs produced after June 28, 2015. The current GFCIs bearing  the UL Certification Mark can no longer be produced after June 28, 2015, but can be sold by manufacturers, retailers, and distributors, and can be used by installers until their inventories are depleted.

The revisions to the tri-national standard were developed by a NEMA-led group in response to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) requesting auto monitoring requirements on GFCIs. Since GFCIs were introduced in the 1970s, they have reduced the number of electrocutions in residential settings. NEMA members, in concert with consumer alerts, always emphasized the need for GFCI units to be tested periodically. It was believed, however, that many individuals did not perform these tests, potentially creating a scenario where a consumer mistakenly assumed that the GFCI was functioning correctly and providing protection from electrocution. Further, even if the tests were performed, it was possible for an undetected failure or malfunction to occur between tests without a system of auto-monitoring.

Chris Walker, Program Manager, Codes & Standards at Eaton Corporation, and NEMA GFCI Technical Committee Chair remarked, "I am proud of the way in which NEMA member manufacturers and the standards developing organizations across North America worked together to write these important updates to the standard."

The codification of the important work to improve the safety of GFCIs and respond to CPSC staff concerns was realized with the approval of a NEMA-sponsored proposal to add GFCI self-test and power denial requirements in the most recent edition of UL 943.

“UL has worked with NEMA members on the UL 943 revisions in an effort to improve the safety of GFCIs and to add a layer of protection for the consumer,” said Lisa Salley, vice president and general manager–Energy and Power Technologies, UL LLC.

NEMA is the association of electrical equipment and medical imaging manufacturers, founded in 1926 and headquartered in Rosslyn, Virginia. Its 400-plus member companies manufacture a diverse set of products including power transmission and distribution equipment, lighting systems, factory automation and control systems, and medical diagnostic imaging systems. Total U.S. shipments for electroindustry products exceed $100 billion annually.

About UL
UL is a global independent safety science company that has championed progress for 120 years. Its more than 10,000 professionals are guided by the UL mission to promote safe working and living environments for all people. We partner with businesses, manufacturers, trade associations and international regulatory authorities to bring solutions to a more complex global supply chain.  For more information about our certification, testing, inspection, advisory and education services, visit http://www.UL.com.

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