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Unwise Policies continue to kill manufacturing jobs.

Press Release Summary:

October 30, 2007 - According to Department of Labor's employment report, manufacturing lost 46,000 jobs in August, reflecting inability of leaders in Washington to craft sensible, pro-growth policies for nation and eliminate impediments that cost America jobs. NAM Senior Vice President for Policy, Jay Timmons said loss of manufacturing jobs is a direct result of Washington's failure to address external costs that make it unnecessarily expensive to create jobs.

National Association of Manufacturing - Washington, DC

Original Press Release

Unwise Policies Continue to Kill Manufacturing Jobs

Press release date: September 7, 2007

WASHINGTON, D.C., September 7, 2007 - The National Association of Manufacturers said today's grim employment report from the Department of Labor reflects the continuing bi-partisan inability of leaders in Washington to craft sensible, pro-growth policies for the nation and eliminate impediments that ultimately cost America jobs. The Labor Department reported that the economy lost 4,000 jobs in August, as the 64,000 jobs lost in construction and manufacturing more than cancelled out the 60,000 jobs gained in the service sector. Over the past three months, private sector employment growth has averaged just 71,000 which is the slowest pace in four years. Manufacturing lost 46,000 jobs in August. "The fact that manufacturing lost 46,000 jobs in August is not a partisan problem, not a Democrat or Republican problem, but a problem for the 46,000 families that have lost work and hope in the future," said NAM President John Engler. "We need to all come together to fix this. Congress must step up to the plate, recognize the impact of decisions it has made in the past that make America less competitive, and do something about it." "Overall manufacturing employment has fallen by 215,000 in the last 12 months, the largest 12-month drop in three years," said NAM chief economist David Huether. "Up until this month, most of the loss of manufacturing jobs was in motor vehicles or sectors closely tied to housing, but in today's report, the decline of manufacturing jobs was more broad-based." NAM Senior Vice President for Policy Jay Timmons said the loss of manufacturing jobs is a direct result of Washington's failure to address the external costs that make it unnecessarily expensive to create jobs. "There is no great mystery to this," Timmons said. "We have carefully documented that the external costs imposed on U.S. manufacturing for energy, excess litigation, regulation, taxes and health care add 31.7 percent to the cost of production in this country compared to our major trading partners. That is a severe disadvantage that has helped kill more than 3 million U.S. manufacturing jobs in this decade. "Manufacturing jobs pay a lot more than jobs in the service sector," Timmons said. "Those 46,000 manufacturing jobs lost in August represent 46,000 families in distress. But right now the best our leaders in Congress can do is debate creative ways to make energy even more expensive than it is already. There is a disconnect between Washington and the real world outside the Beltway, and the real world is paying the price." The National Association of Manufacturers is the nation's largest industrial trade association, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the NAM has 10 additional offices across the country. Visit the NAM's award-winning web site at www.nam.org for more information about manufacturing and the economy. HANK COX (202) 637-3090 DAVID HUETHER (202) 637-3148

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