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NAM urges U.S.-China cooperation for safe imports.

Press Release Summary:

August 14, 2007 - According to Jay Timmons, NAM's senior vice president of policy and government relations, variety of strong actions are needed to respond to safety and health issues posed by faulty Chinese goods. Timmons pointed to reports of contaminated pet food, fake pharmaceuticals, toys and jewelry with dangerous levels of lead, poisoned fish, and other unsafe products. China must make broader use of internationally recognized quality certification programs.

National Association of Manufacturing - Washington, DC

Original Press Release

NAM Urges U.S.-China Cooperation For Safe Imports

Press release date: July 18, 2007

It's Important China Recognizes Our Concerns are for Public Safety, Not Protectionism WASHINGTON, D.C., July 18, 2007 - The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) today told Congress the safety of Chinese imports are of the utmost concern to America's manufacturers and consumers. "The situation demands action on China's part and, as necessary, pressure from the United States to prompt that action," Jay Timmons, the NAM's senior vice president of policy and government relations told the Senate Commerce Committee. "But a healthy, long-term U.S.-China bilateral trade relationship is in both countries' interests. Therefore, it's important we take advantage of every opportunity to work cooperatively on issues of mutual concern." Timmons pointed to reports of contaminated pet food, fake pharmaceuticals, toys and jewelry with dangerous levels of lead, poisoned fish and other unsafe products as representing a serious problem. "A variety of strong actions are needed to respond to the safety and health issues posed by faulty Chinese goods," Timmons said. This includes expanding efforts to ensure the quality of imports and addressing the resources provided to agencies such as the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS). "China must make broader use of internationally recognized quality certification programs," he said. "This includes permitting U.S. testing and certification providers to operate in China. "To ensure the safety of our imports, we must take care to approach it as a health and safety issue," Timmons said. "Using safety to achieve disguised protectionist aims will undermine the seriousness of these concerns, while strengthening the hands of those abroad who seek any justification for economic retaliation." Timmons' complete testimony is available at http://nam.org/s_nam/sec.asp?CID=202137&DID=233361 The National Association of Manufacturers is the nation's largest industrial trade association, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the NAM has 11 additional offices across the country. Visit the NAM's award-winning web site at www.nam.org for more information about manufacturing and the economy. CONTACTS: J.P. FIELDER (202) 637-3089

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