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Appli-thane(TM) 7300 has OUTSTANDING thermal conductivity, is insulative, is more flexible than epoxies allowing for greater CTE mismatch, and is easy to remove for rework or alteration if needed.

KEY FEATURES

Exceptionally high thermal conductivity: 2.5 W/mºK

Electrically Insulative

Superior Thermal Cycling

Available in premixed and frozen format

Low modulus

Low glass transition temperature [Tg]: -40ºC

Meets NASA outgassing requirements

Service temperature: -100ºC to 160ºC

Highly filled yet self leveling

Long work life at room temperature: 4 hours

Ideal for electrical potting

Shelf life: 6 months at -40ºC

Appli-thane(TM) 7300 is a blue, thermally conductive polyurethane adhesive compound for advanced electronic assembly. It is a self-leveling, injectable compound suitable for electronic bonding and potting, and may also be used for bonding leaded components. It has a long potlife which maintains its dispensability for 4 hours, making it suitable for automated dispensing. Appli-thane(TM) 7300 has a thermal conductivity of 2.5 W/m°K, and cures to a semi-flexible state with relatively low modulus and a very low Glass Transition Temperature (Tg). The cured material's ability to not crack or harm bonded rigid components during thermal cycling is a major plus. Because of its high filler loading, the CTE of Appli-thane(TM) 7300 is much lower than conventional polyurethane elastomers. Appli-thane(TM) 7300 passes NASA outgassing requirements with either room temperature cure or heat curing. Appli-thane(TM) 7300 provides best in class thermal conductivity for applications requiring aggressive heat dissipation of components.

This material may be heat-cured at moderate temperatures, reaching full properties in four hours at 72º C or in two hours at 96º C. It may also be cured at room temperature in cases where heat-cure is impractical, although heat-cure is recommended. Full properties, including NASA's outgassing requirements, are achieved with either room-temperature or heat curing.

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