New Gravitational-Inertial Classifier (GIC) Reduces The Risk of Worker Exposure to Potentially Hazardous Materials

Press Release Summary:

  • Automatically separates dry materials without water to eliminate the need for settling ponds, sludge pits and other basins
  • Ideal for classifying manufactured sand, cement, crushed stone, salt, lime, soda ash and a variety of other aggregates and minerals
  • Separates particles at any cut point from 300 μm to 63 μm (50 to 230 mesh)

Original Press Release:

Dry Particle Classification System Eliminates Need for Settling Ponds

Classifying Without Water, Van Tongeren Aids Worker Safety, Creates Space

Lebanon, PA: Now a green solution for conserving water in aggregate mining and production also solves land use and worker safety troubles. The Gravitational-Inertial Classifier (GIC) system from process equipment manufacturer Van Tongeren America, Lebanon, Pa. (Van-Tongeren.com), automatically separates dry materials without water to eliminate the need for settling ponds, sludge pits and other basins required to manage the high volumes of wastewater generated daily by the traditional wet process. A modern, environmentally friendly approach, the GIC opens large areas of land that may be used to increase production and/or store material instead of for managing wastewater.

By removing settling ponds from the site, the GIC also reduces the risk of worker exposure to potentially hazardous materials and eliminates permit-required confined spaces along with the need for dedicated, personal protective equipment while streamlining the permitting process for new plants. “Real estate is at a premium, so if you don't use land for settling ponds then you're essentially creating more land at no cost, just by using the GIC,” says Steve Demeyer, process management manager for Luck Stone, Manakin Sabot, Virginia.

Ideal for classifying manufactured sand, cement, crushed stone, salt, lime, soda ash and a variety of other aggregates and minerals, the Gravitational-Inertial Classifier system features a proprietary, heart-shaped design that passes a current of air through a curtain of falling material then directs each particle towards a series of angled vanes. Coarse particles are discharged and entrained fine particles are recirculated in an eddy current until discharged and captured by a dust collector. The GIC separates particles at any cut point from 300 μm to 63 μm (50 to 230 mesh) in unattended, 24/7 operation.

Media Contact:

Paul Entin at 908-479-4231, paul@eprmarketing.com

Clarence Kreiser at 717-450-3835, clarencek@VanTongerenAmerica.com

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