Association News

ASTM Standard covers natural esters as insulating liquid.

Press Release Summary:

Dec 17, 2014 - Proposed standard ASTM WK21616, Test Method for Oxidation Induction Time of Natural Ester Insulating Fluids by Regular Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) will provide electrical power industry with straightforward test for oxidation stability of natural esters. Described DSC oxidation induction time method takes 2–3 hr, is direct oxidation measurement requiring minimal sample size, and does not use hazardous laboratory chemicals that require disposal.

ASTM International - West Conshohocken, PA

Original Press Release

Use of Natural Esters as Power Transformer Insulating Liquid to Be Covered in Proposed New ASTM Standard

Press release date: Jul 18, 2014

A proposed new ASTM International standard will provide the electrical power industry with a relatively straightforward test for oxidation stability of natural esters.

Natural esters, also known as vegetable oils, can be used as an alternative to mineral oil as an insulating liquid in power transformers and other electrical equipment. The proposed standard is ASTM WK21616, Test Method for Oxidation Induction Time of Natural Ester Insulating Fluids by Regular Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC).

“The history of dielectric insulating fluids developed with mineral oil as the main liquid dielectric,” says ASTM member Kevin Rapp, senior chemist, Cargill Industrial Specialties. “Electrical power industry experience and the majority of knowledge has been devoted to mineral oil, which has a chemical composition much different from natural esters. Thus, many of the oxidation test methods developed for mineral oils cannot be applied to natural ester fluids.”

The DSC oxidation induction time method as described in ASTM WK21616 takes between two and three hours, is a direct oxidation measurement using a very small sample size and does not use hazardous laboratory chemicals that require disposal.

Once it has been approved, ASTM WK21616 will find use among fluid and equipment manufacturers, specifiers, end users and testing laboratories that currently have no standard method for measuring oxidation stability of natural ester dielectric fluids.

ASTM WK21616 was developed by Subcommittee D27.15 on Planning Resource and Development and was recently assigned to Subcommittee D27.06 on Chemical Methods. Both subcommittees are part of ASTM International Committee D27 on Electrical Insulating Liquids and Gases. The subcommittee invites all interested parties, particularly those who use DSC equipment, to take part in the ongoing development of WK21616.

ASTM International welcomes participation in the development of its standards. For more information on becoming an ASTM member, visit www.astm.org/JOIN.

For more news in this sector, visit www.astm.org/sn-energy or follow us on Twitter @ASTMEnergy.

ASTM Committee D27 Next Meeting: Nov. 911, 2014, November Committee Week, New Orleans, La.

Technical Contact: Kevin J. Rapp, Cargill Industrial Specialties, Brookfield, Wis., Phone: 262-797-5584; kevin_rapp@cargill.com

ASTM Staff Contact: Kelly Paul, Phone: 610-832-9745; kpaul@astm.org
ASTM PR Contact: Barbara Schindler, Phone: 610-832-9603; bschindl@astm.org