Association News

AAMA addresses door performance standards.

Press Release Summary:

Mar 27, 2008 - During ICC Code Development Hearings on Feb 18, 2008, AAMA recommended modifications to S141 code proposal for exterior side-hinged doors, which would require exterior doors to be tested and labeled according to AAMA/WDMA/CSA 101/I.S. 2/A440. AAMA recommended exceptions to S141 requirement including door assemblies in high wind areas, non-habitable spaces, and protective overhangs with overhang ratio equal to or greater than 1.

American Architectural Manufacturers Association - Schaumburg, IL

Original Press Release

AAMA Continues Discussions with AMD on Door Performance Standards, Component Swapping and Modifications to S141

Press release date: Mar 05, 2008

SCHAUMBURG, Ill. -- American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) recommended modifications to S141 code proposal for exterior side-hinged doors during the ICC Code Development Hearings on Monday, February 18, 2008, in Palm Springs, Calif. S141, which was voted down at these hearings, was proposed by the Window and Door Manufacturers Association (WDMA) and would require exterior doors to be tested and labeled according to AAMA/WDMA/CSA 101/I.S. 2/A440.

AAMA recommended exceptions to the S141 requirement including door assemblies in high wind areas, non-habitable spaces, and protective overhangs with an overhang ratio equal to or greater than 1.

"Due to multiple variations of door components, the increased amount of testing that would be required if S141 had passed as written by WDMA is not reasonably feasible," according to John Lewis, AAMA technical director.

AAMA continues discussions with the Association of Millwork Distributors (AMD) that began several years ago regarding door performance standards as defined by AAMA/WDMA/CSA 101/I.S. 2/A440. "AMD has been involved for several years regarding this specification development, and AAMA continues to work productively and proactively with AMD members to address performance certification and structural component substitutions," says Lewis.

Lewis adds, "We believe that when a door system's performance is proven and certified for the opening and application into which it's installed, then door pre-hangers, contractors and homeowners reduce their risk and cost associated with clean-up, replacement and/or destruction of the building contents resulting from issues relating to water leakage due to door failure and breaching of the building envelope." In a situation where the interior and furnishings of a home are damaged from a breach in the building envelope, the costs associated with product testing and certification pale in comparison.

"Builders and consumers are quite familiar with code requirements for higher-performing windows and glass doors in coastal regions. To protect residents and their properties, the Florida Building Code requires window products to be certified, rated or engineered for performance. As with windows, AAMA wants doors to be required to withstand the same severe elements in these regions," explains Lewis.

"AAMA standards and its certification program level the playing field for all fenestration product manufacturers who want to serve homeowners in these regions," Lewis continues. "Toward this goal, we are actively working with AMD to qualify the door configurations such as with full-, half- or non-glazed areas. While we recognize that it will not be feasible to test each and every configuration of components, manufacturers already deal with this and choose the product offerings they wish to have rated and certified. One way manufacturers limit testing is to submit a multiple-unit assembly, which qualifies the individual units that comprise the overall configuration."

"We are focused on developing a means to interchange components without having to retest. Much of this effort places the testing requirement on the component suppliers with minimal testing necessary by the door pre-hanger," Lewis says. "Currently, component substitutions are allowed under certification programs based on waiver of retest or engineering analysis, but this is not part of the specification." As an example of explicit substitutions standards and specifications, he cites AAMA 930-03 Voluntary Specification for Water Penetration Resistance and Structural Load Performance of Locking/Latching Hardware Used in Side-Hinged Door System, which allows component substitutions of door lockset hardware.

"Both AAMA and AMD expect that a component swapping system for side-hinged doors is a realistic goal for at least some performance requirements. We continue to work together to establish that system to the extent possible and ultimately create a stronger, more aligned industry," concludes Lewis.

For more information on AAMA's leadership and activities, please visit AAMA News and Events or call 847-303-5664.

AAMA is the source of performance standards, product certification, and educational programs for the fenestration industry.SM

Angela Dickson, Senior Coordinator of Communications, AAMA E-mail: adickson@aamanet.org 847-303-5859 Ext. 224