Association News

NAM and CACP address counterfeiting and piracy concerns.

Press Release Summary:

July 10, 2007 - NAM, along with other members of the Coalition Against Counterfeiting and Piracy (CACP), introduced an agenda to address the challenges posed by counterfeiting and piracy. Counterfeiting and piracy costs the U.S. economy between $200-250 billion/yr, results in the loss of 750,000 jobs, and threatens public health and safety. Globally, these products represent between $500-600 billion and about 5% of worldwide trade.

National Association of Manufacturing - Washington, DC

Original Press Release

"Campaign is about Defending American Jobs, Innovation, & Consumer Health," Engler Says

Press release date: June 14, 2007

WASHINGTON, D.C., June 14, 2007 - The National Association of Manufacturers, along with other members of the Coalition Against Counterfeiting and Piracy (CACP), today introduced a comprehensive agenda to address the challenges posed by counterfeiting and piracy. "The greatest advantage of U.S. manufacturers in international trade is the creative genius of our people and we're not going to stand by and watch as this is ripped off by piracy crooks," said NAM President John Engler. "This campaign is about defending American jobs, innovation and consumer health by strengthening intellectual property laws and increasing government resources to ensure effective enforcement these laws." Counterfeiting and piracy costs the U.S. economy between $200 and $250 billion a year, results in the loss of 750,000 jobs and threatens public health and safety. Globally, these fake products represent between $500 and $600 billion and about 5 percent of worldwide trade. "The counterfeiting epidemic is costing us money and jobs, and it is creating hazards for U.S. consumers," Engler said. "From counterfeit medicines to auto parts to home appliances, they are endangering the lives of our citizens with tragic consequences. "This initiative allows the government to recognize new resources in the fight against counterfeiting and piracy," he said. "Manufacturers want to help the government do their job in protecting our intellectual property, so we need to make sure they have the resources to do their job." The National Association of Manufacturers is the nation's largest industrial trade association, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the NAM has 11 additional offices across the country. Visit the NAM's award-winning web site at www.nam.org for more information about manufacturing and the economy. CONTACTS: J.P. FIELDER (202) 637-3089; BILL PRIMOSCH (202) 637-3145

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