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IPC Standard helps define how clean is clean.

Press Release Summary:

February 17, 2010 - IPC's cleaning standard, IPC-5704 defines recommended requirements for cleanliness of unpopulated single, double-sided, and multilayer printed boards. Standard provides hard specifications and requirements for maximum limits of ionic contamination using ion chromatography testing. In addition, IPC-5704 delivers industry guidance on cleanliness testing for both product acceptance and process control, verifying that all equipment and chemistries are stable.

IPC-Association Connecting Electronics Industries - Bannockburn, IL

Original Press Release

New IPC Standard Helps Define How Clean Is Clean

Press release date: February 15, 2010

BANNOCKBURN, Ill., USA, - How clean is clean when it comes to printed circuit boards and assemblies? While John Perry, IPC technical project manager, can enumerate a litany of complex variables that come into play with an answer to that question, a new cleaning standard, IPC-5704, Cleanliness Requirements for Unpopulated Printed Boards, defines the recommended requirements for the cleanliness of unpopulated single, double-sided and multilayer printed boards. A vital complement to the June 2007 release of IPC-5702 which describes factors to consider when determining what tests to run for assessing the impact/risk of residues on long-term life (e.g., end-use environment, design/service life and technology involved), IPC-5704 provides the hard specifications and requirements for maximum limits of ionic contamination using ion chromatography testing. In addition, IPC-5704 delivers industry guidance on cleanliness testing for both product acceptance and process control, verifying that all equipment and chemistries are stable. "The cleanliness of a printed board can directly impact the effectiveness or quality of an assembled printed board," explains Perry. "Residues increase the risk of field failures or can electrically impede a printed board's function, so having acceptance criteria for various levels of testing as well as direction on how many samples should be tested is extremely important." Referenced in the new cleanliness standard, IPC-TM-650 Method 2.3.28.2, Bare Printed Board Cleanliness by Ion Chromatography is the new test procedure that should be used in conjunction with IPC-5704 to measure the level of anionic and cationic residues on the surface of unpopulated (bare) printed boards by ion chromatography. For more information on IPC-5704, visit ipc.org/ipc-5704 or contact Perry at JohnPerry@ipc.org or +1 847-597-2818. About IPC
IPC (www.IPC.org) is a global trade association based in Bannockburn, Ill., dedicated to the competitive excellence and financial success of its 2,700 member companies which represent all facets of the electronics industry, including design, printed board manufacturing, electronics assembly and test. As a member-driven organization and leading source for industry standards, training, market research and public policy advocacy, IPC supports programs to meet the needs of an estimated $1.7 trillion global electronics industry. IPC maintains additional offices in Taos, N.M.; Arlington, Va.; Garden Grove, Calif.; Stockholm, Sweden; Moscow, Russia; and Shanghai and Shenzhen, China.

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