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ASTM Standard offers testing technique for corrosion.

Press Release Summary:

June 12, 2009 - Developed by Subcommittee G01.11, G199 Standard provides procedure for making electrochemical noise measurements for detection of general and localized forms of corrosion. It also offers number of methods for analyzing resulting data. G199 is primarily geared toward laboratory-based users with interest in localized corrosion, although it could also be applied to some in-service applications, depending on certified hazardous area classification of equipment used.

ASTM International - West Conshohocken, PA

Original Press Release

New ASTM Standard Provides Electrochemical Test Measurement Technique for Corrosion

Press release date: June 10, 2009

W. CONSHOHOCKEN, Pa., 10 June 2009-Localized corrosion, such as pitting, cracking or crevice corrosion, can be destructive to process equipment, but if it is detected early enough, potential damage can be minimized or avoided. A new ASTM International standard provides a means for electrochemical testing for corrosion. The new standard, G199, Guide for Electrochemical Noise Measurement, was developed by Subcommittee G01.11 on Electrochemical Measurements in Corrosion Testing, part of Committee G01 on Corrosion of Metals. According to Dawn Eden, a specialist in corrosion solutions with Honeywell Process Solutions and a G01 member, G199 will serve multiple purposes. "Aside from the procedure for making electrochemical noise measurements for the detection of general and localized forms of corrosion, the guide provides a number of methods for analyzing the resulting data," says Eden. "This will be particularly helpful to new users since many data analysis methods have been applied to electrochemical noise over its almost 30-year history and the brief overview has been assembled with input from many experienced users." Eden notes that G199 is primarily geared toward laboratory-based users with an interest in localized corrosion, although it could also be applied to some in-service applications, depending on the certified hazardous area classification of the equipment used. Subcommittee G01.11 plans to continue its work in the area of electrochemical measurements. Eden says that, while G199 is a guide, there is a great opportunity for interested parties to work toward a test method or practice that includes data recorded from specific cases of localized corrosion, as well as its analysis. "Active participation in new standard development would be welcomed from all quarters, ideally covering a broad spectrum of application experience in both laboratory and in-service studies," says Eden. Sankara Papavinasam, senior research scientist, CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory, and chair of Subcommittee G01.11, says that the subcommittee has developed 17 standards on electrochemical techniques for corrosion measurement and monitoring. In addition, the subcommittee regularly organizes a symposium to review advancements in electrochemical techniques for corrosion equipment. A special technical publication containing the most recent symposium papers will be published this summer. ASTM standards are available from Customer Service (phone: 610-832-9585; service@astm.org) or at www.astm.org. For technical Information, contact Dawn Eden, Honeywell International Inc., Houston, Texas (phone: 281-444-2282; ext. 31; dawn.eden@honeywell.com); or Sankara Papavinasam, CANMET Materials Technical Laboratory, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (phone: 613-947-3603; spapavin@nrcan.gc.ca). ASTM Committee G01 meets Nov. 11-12 during November committee week in Atlanta, Ga. ASTM International welcomes and encourages participation in the development of its standards. ASTM's open consensus process, using advanced Internet-based standards development tools, ensures worldwide access for all interested individuals. For more information on becoming an ASTM member, please contact Kevin Shanahan, ASTM International (phone: 610-832-9737; kshanaha@astm.org). Established in 1898, ASTM International is one of the largest international standards development and delivery systems in the world. ASTM International meets the World Trade Organization (WTO) principles for the development of international standards: coherence, consensus, development dimension, effectiveness, impartiality, openness, relevance and transparency. ASTM standards are accepted and used in research and development, product testing, quality systems and commercial transactions around the globe. Contact: Barbara Schindler
610-832-9603; bschindl@astm.org

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