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ASTM Committee seeks input on hydrophobic standard revisions.

Press Release Summary:

February 22, 2012 - ASTM International Committee E21 on Space Simulation and Applications of Space Technology is requesting input on upcoming revisions for ASTM F21 Test Method for Hydrophobic Surface Films by the Atomizer Test, and ASTM F22, Test Method for Hydrophobic Surface Films by the Water-Break Test. While not quantitative, these methods are used to verify that surfaces are sufficiently free of hydrophobic contaminants to proceed to application of primer, plating, adhesives, or conversion coatings.

ASTM International - West Conshohocken, PA

Original Press Release

ASTM Space Simulation Committee Seeks Input on Revisions to Hydrophobic Standards

Press release date: February 17, 2012

W. CONSHOHOCKEN, Pa., -ASTM International Committee E21 on Space Simulation and Applications of Space Technology is requesting input on upcoming revisions for two standards under the jurisdiction of Subcommittee E21.05 on Contamination. The two standards to be revised are ASTM F21, Test Method for Hydrophobic Surface Films by the Atomizer Test, and ASTM F22, Test Method for Hydrophobic Surface Films by the Water-Break Test. Commonly known as water-break tests, the two standards are used to evaluate surface cleanliness by observing surface wetting by water. "Observation of the behavior of water after application by atomizer, as in ASTM F21, or on removal of the part from immersion, as in ASTM F22, has been used for decades, if not centuries, to assess surface cleanliness," says Nikki Lowrey, senior contamination control engineer, Jacobs Technology Inc. "These test methods, while not quantitative, are frequently used as rapid, low-cost methods to verify that surfaces are sufficiently free of hydrophobic contaminants to proceed to application of primer, plating, adhesives, conversion coatings or other surface treatments." All interested parties are invited to participate in E21.05's work. In order to proceed with revisions to ASTM F21 and ASTM F22, E21.05 would like feedback on current industry practices in water-break testing, particularly in the following areas: o Purity requirements for the test water;
o Low-cost alternatives to the cleaved mica blank method for verification of the absence of hydrophilic contaminants in the test materials that may invalidate the test;
o Addition of a section discussing the relationship of ASTM F21 and ASTM F22 to surface energy and the quantitative measurement of cleanliness by contact angle, comparative test solutions (such as in ASTM D2578, Test Method for Wetting Tension of Polyethylene and Polypropylene Films), or other methods;
o Consideration for an addition to ASTM F22 on the application of this method to testing on large parts where water break is observed after flowing water over the surface from a nozzle; and
o Addition of notes on the proper use and misuse of water-break testing, including proper drying after the test to prevent recontamination. ASTM International standards can be purchased from Customer Service (phone: 610-832-9585; service@astm.org). ASTM International welcomes and encourages participation in the development of its standards. For more information on becoming an ASTM member, visit www.astm.org/JOIN. ASTM International is one of the largest international standards development and delivery systems in the world. ASTM International meets the World Trade Organization (WTO) principles for the development of international standards: coherence, consensus, development dimension, effectiveness, impartiality, openness, relevance and transparency. ASTM standards are accepted and used in research and development, product testing, quality systems and commercial transactions. For more news in this sector, visit astm.org/sn-transportation or follow us on Twitter @ASTMTransport. ASTM Committee E21 Next Meeting: April 19, 2012, April committee week, Phoenix, Ariz.
ASTM Staff Contact: Rick Lake, Phone: 610-832-9689; rlake@astm.org
ASTM PR Contact: Barbara Schindler, Phone: 610-832-9603; bschindl@astm.org

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