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EPA approves new coolant for car air conditioning systems.

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March 1, 2011 - U.S. EPA has issued final approval for new refrigerant that does not deplete the ozone layer, which helps protect the environment and people's health. When used appropriately, HFO-1234yf can reduce environmental impact of motor vehicle air conditioners and has global warming potential that is 99.7% less than HFC-134a, which is currently used in most car air conditioners. HFO-1234yf may now be used in new cars and light trucks.

EPA Approves New Coolant for Car Air Conditioning Systems


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Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Ariel Rios Building
Washington, DC, 20460
USA



Press release date: February 28, 2011

Better climate protection without harming the ozone layer

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued final approval for a new refrigerant for use in motor vehicle air conditioning systems that does not deplete the ozone layer, which helps protect the environment and people's health. The new chemical, HFO-1234yf, may now be used in air conditioning for new cars and light trucks. When used appropriately, this chemical can reduce the environmental impact of motor vehicle air conditioners and has a global warming potential that is 99.7 percent less than the current chemical (HFC-134a) used in most car air conditioners.

"This new chemical helps fight climate change and ozone depletion," said Gina McCarthy, assistant administrator for EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. "It is homegrown innovative solutions like this that save lives and strengthen our economy."

EPA assists in the transition to green technologies by identifying alternatives that are better for people's health and the environment. EPA's recent standards for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from light-duty motor vehicles provide an opportunity for automakers to receive credit for adopting a chemical with less climate impact as a cost-effective way to meet the new standards. Using HFO-1234yf is one option available to automakers.

Prior to HFC-134a, car air conditioners generally used CFC-12, a potent greenhouse gas and ozone-depleting substance. Depleting the stratospheric ozone layer leads to higher levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the Earth's surface. UV radiation has several harmful effects, including skin cancer, cataracts, immune system suppression, and premature aging and wrinkling of the skin. For these reasons, it is important to check the UV Index and remember sun safety: wear hats, sunglasses, and sunscreen.

More information:
http://www.epa.gov/ozone/snap/
http://www.epa.gov/sunwise/uvindex.html
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