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ASTM Concrete Committee developing proposed new standards.

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August 10, 2009 - Four standards are being developed by subcommittees under jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C09. They include WK24621, Test Method for Measurement of Aggregate Resistivity Using 2-Electrode Soil Box Method; ASTM WK23421, Specification for Lightweight Aggregates for Internal Curing Applications; ASTM WK24405, Specification for Reactive Methacrylate Bonding Systems for Concrete; and ASTM WK23967, Practice for Measuring Hydration Kinetics of Hydraulic Cementitious Mixtures Using Semi-Adiabatic Calorimetry.

ASTM Concrete Committee Developing Proposed New Standards


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ASTM International
100 Barr Harbor Dr., Box C700
West Conshohocken, PA, 19428-2959
USA



Press release date: August 6, 2009

Subjects Include Aggregate Resistivity, Lightweight Aggregates, Methacrylate Bonding Systems and Semi-Adiabatic Calorimetry

W. CONSHOHOCKEN, Pa., August 6, 2009-The following four proposed new standards are among those currently being developed by subcommittees under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C09 on Concrete and Concrete Aggregates. Subject matter covered by these standards includes aggregate resistivity, lightweight aggregates, methacrylate bonding systems and semi-adiabatic calorimetry.

All interested parties are invited to participate in the standards developing activities of ASTM Committee C09 subcommittees.

Aggregate Resistivity
Reinforcement embedded in embankment walls during construction is affected by the environment's resistance to corrosion. A proposed new test method will be useful in measuring how resistant the aggregate used for such reinforcement will be. ASTM WK24621, Test Method for Measurement of Aggregate Resistivity Using the Two-Electrode Soil Box Method, is being developed by Subcommittee C09.20 on Normal Weight Aggregates.

John Yzenas, director, Technical Services SMSG, Edward C. Levy Co., and a member of Committee C09, says that, in addition to Subcommittee C09.20, Subcommittee G01.10 on Corrosion in Soils, part of ASTM International Committee G01 on Corrosion of Metals, has also been involved in the development of ASTM WK24621.

"G01.10's original work resolved many questions that previous test methods had left unanswered, such as adequate description of 100% saturation, ability to test various size materials and testing materials in 'as-received' condition," says Yzenas. "This proposed test method is a variation of G01.10's work, dealing specifically with aggregate."

Yzenas notes that, upon its approval, ASTM WK24621 will be useful to designers, specifiers and testing companies because current corrosion test methods are based on soils and may not adequately characterize aggregates.

Lightweight Aggregates
The proposed new standard, ASTM WK23421, Specification for Lightweight Aggregates for Internal Curing Applications, is being developed by Subcommittee C09.21 on Lightweight Aggregates and Concrete because lightweight aggregates are used differently during the internal curing process than when they are used for other purposes.

"Instead of using lightweight aggregates to reduce the density of the concrete, the pre-wetted or preconditioned lightweight aggregates are used in relatively small quantities in high performance normal weight concrete to provide internal moisture reservoirs throughout the cross-section of the concrete," says Jeffrey Speck, vice president - sales and marketing, Big River Industries Inc., and chair of C09.21.

Speck says that users of ASTM WK23421, once it is approved, will be design engineers who are designing structures built of concrete with a very low water/cementitious materials ratio and by concrete producers supplying the concrete for such structures.

Highway engineers will also find the proposed standard useful, since lightweight aggregates used for internal curing are proving to be effective in reducing concrete pavement cracking.

Methacrylate Bonding Systems
Methacrylate is used to strengthen and fortify finely cracked concrete and to minimize the ingress of contaminants such as chlorides and deicing salts that could further degrade concrete. Once approved, a proposed new standard, ASTM WK24405, Specification for Reactive Methacrylate Bonding Systems for Concrete, will provide guidance on relevant properties for these bonding systems and how to evaluate such properties to enable users to determine acceptable material performance.

ASTM WK24405 is being developed by Subcommittee C09.25 on Organic Materials for Bonding. According to Quentin Hibben, senior research chemist, Simpson Strong-Tie Anchor Systems, and a member of the subcommittee, the proposed new standard will primarily be used by specifiers, engineers and material producers for bridge maintenance, parking deck and airport tarmac projects. Departments of transportation could also potentially use the proposed standard for a variety of projects.

Hibben notes that the subcommittee is seeking input and guidance for relevant properties and acceptable values for low viscosity methacrylate-based resin systems, as well as assistance in reproducibility testing.

Semi-Adiabatic Calorimetry
Thermal measurements of hydrating cementitious mixtures, referred to as "semi-adiabatic calorimetry," can be used to evaluate behavior of concrete mixtures and concrete-making materials as well as for troubleshooting certain types of abnormal concrete performance. Interest in using SAC for these purposes has grown in recent years, along with increased availability of both generic hardware that can be used for SAC and manufactured systems designed specifically for the process.

A proposed new standard, ASTM WK23967, Practice for Measuring Hydration Kinetics of Hydraulic Cementitious Mixtures Using Semi-Adiabatic Calorimetry, will help guide users in planning and implementing productive SAC testing programs for concrete mixture evaluation. WK23967 is being developed by Subcommittee C09.48 on Performance of Cementitious Materials and Admixture Combinations.

Tim Cost, senior technical service engineer, Holcim (US) Inc., and chair of the task group that is developing the practice, says that, when approved, ASTM WK23967 will provide standard protocols for conducting tests that will help assure meaningful and repeatable results and will help users avoid methods and test conditions that have been shown to produce confusing or misleading data. The proposed standard will be used by ready-mixed concrete producers, suppliers of concrete-making materials, contractors, testing firms, researchers and academia.

Doug Hooton, University of Toronto, and chair, Subcommittee C09.48, says that this new practice will help both suppliers of materials and concrete producers to pinpoint the source of fresh concrete problems in increasingly complex concrete mixtures and can be used to help prevent future problems as materials properties, mixture proportions and placing temperatures change.

For technical information, contact: (ASTM WK24621) John Yzenas, Edward C. Levy Co., Valparaiso, Ind. (phone: 219-462-2924; jyzenas@msn.com); (ASTM WK23421) Jeffrey Speck, Big River Industries Inc., Alpharetta, Ga. (phone: 678-461-2830; jeff.speck@bigriverind.com); (ASTM WK24405) Quentin Hibben, Simpson Strong-Tie Anchor Systems, Addison, Ill. (phone: 630-613-5126; qhibben@strongtie.com); (ASTM WK23967) Tim Cost, Holcim US Inc., Canton, Miss. (phone: 601-856-2487; tim.cost@holcim.com). ASTM Committee C09 meets Dec. 7-9 during December committee week in Atlanta, Ga.

ASTM International welcomes and encourages participation in the development of its standards. ASTM's open consensus process, using advanced Internet-based standards development tools, ensure worldwide access for all interested individuals. For more information on becoming an ASTM member, please contact Scott Orthey, ASTM International (Phone: 610-832-9730; sorthey@astm.org).

Established in 1898, ASTM International is one of the largest international standards development and delivery systems in the world. ASTM International meets the World Trade Organization (WTO) principles for the development of international standards: coherence, consensus, development dimension, effectiveness, impartiality, openness, relevance and transparency. ASTM standards are accepted and used in research and development, product testing, quality systems and commercial transactions around the globe.

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